My first grader is a big kid. Does he still need to ride in a child safety seat?

Yes, in all likelihood.

According to the Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children older than 2. But, despite car accidents being a major cause of death, the number of child passenger deaths has declined by half since 1975. As parents and caregivers step up their restraint use, we may see that number decline even more.

Child safety seats are designed to protect the fragile bodies of children from injuries or death. Although laws vary across jurisdictions, child safety seats are required for most young children. For example, Maryland’s current law requires that a child under age eight ride in an appropriate child restraint, unless the child is 57 inches (four feet, nine inches) or taller. Any child from age 8 to 16 years old who is not riding in a child safety seat must be secured in a seat belt. If your child rides around in Maryland, he must use an appropriate child restraint unless he meets those requirements. But even if he does meet those requirements, you may still wish to use some form of child restraint. Many are made to accommodate children who are big enough to legally ride without a restraint. In some cases, these children may be safer using a child safety restraint than a just seat belt.

If you or your child got hurt in a traffic accident, you may wish to discuss your options with a Maryland car accident lawyer. You may reach our Maryland traffic accident lawyers at Lewis & Tompkins, P.C. by calling 202-296-0666 or by filling out our online contact form.

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