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Distracted driving can cause serious injuries

| Jan 4, 2021 | Car Accidents

Anyone who is familiar with the Washington, D.C. metro area knows that it’s not uncommon to spend a considerable amount of time on congested roads.

In Washington, D.C., distracted driving is against the law and it can cause serious accidents. Distracted driving includes texting and talking on a cell phone unless it is hands-free, personal grooming, reading or other activities which cause the driver to be inattentive. Drivers who violate this law can be subject to penalties.

If it is the driver’s first incident within 18 months, the driver can be assessed a $100 fine. A second violation can result in a $150 fine and a third can result in a $200 fine and driver’s license suspension anywhere from 30 to 90 days.

In situations where distracted driving results in a death, injury or property damage, the driver can face higher fines and jail time.

When police respond to a car accident in Washington, D.C. they must make a report that indicates whether a cell phone or other electronic device was present in the car and whether the use of the cell phone or other distractions contributed to the cause of the accident.

This report and cell phone activity reports can be useful to demonstrate distracted driving caused a person’s injuries.

Injuries caused by distracted driving

Victims may suffer serious injuries that cause them physical harm, emotional suffering and loss of income because they are unable to work or the amount they can work is reduced.

Distracted driving accidents can even result in death, leaving family members with a tremendous loss and questions about how to recover.

An experienced attorney can help victims pursue compensation and apply the law to their circumstances, whether they live in Washington, D.C. city limits or the surrounding metro areas.